"The truth we fear to reveal"

By Anthony Castrovince/MLB.com
http://www.twitter.com/castrovince

sabathia2.jpgI know I said I wouldn’t be blogging for a few days, but that was before I opened this morning’s Cleveland Plain Dealer to find a 6-foot-7, 290-pound man sticking his size-15 foot in his mouth.

This was what AL All-Star CC Sabathia had to say when asked about the disintegration of the 2007 Cleveland Indians team that fell a win shy of the World Series:

“That wasn’t our fault,” Sabathia said. “They traded us. That’s on them.”

Sabathia went on to say, “If [ownership] had kept everybody for at least two more years, I think we had a chance of having a really good team.”

Is Sabathia delusional? Or is he merely the latest member of the Yankees to “misremember” something?

I’ll submit that neither is the case. Sabathia, you see, is taking advantage of the opportunity the July 2008 trade that sent him to Milwaukee afforded him to divorce himself from all blame or finger-pointing and to feed off the raw emotions of those who have done little to nothing to understand the Indians’ economic position in an unbalanced marketplace.

Sabathia says something insipid like, “It’s on them,” because he’ll say anything to avoid looking like the bad guy. And this isn’t the first time.

Throughout the phantom contract negotiation process before the 2008 season, when it was clear the Indians were as likely to get Sabathia to commit to a long-term deal as they were to throw a dome on Progressive Field, CC would say things like, “Hopefully we can get something done.”  Because that was a lot easier and less publicly damaging than saying, “The Indians have no chance of offering me the kind of money I feel I’m worth.”

In the winter before the ’08 season, when the Indians offered Sabathia around $18 million a year through 2012 — the largest offer the franchise has ever come up with for a player — he didn’t so much as sleep on it. He knew he was gone, and he broke off negotiations before they even started in Spring Training.

This is the reality. But now, two and a half years later, CC — which, in this case, stands for Clouded Context — is selling a fantasy. An alternate universe in which those heinous, loveless Indians owners cast him out of the place he loved.

It’s baloney.

Essentially, Sabathia got lucky. Because 50 years from now, Indians fans won’t remember him as the guy who walked away from the Tribe for the big payday elsewhere. He won’t go down with the likes of Albert Belle, Manny Ramirez and Jim Thome. Rather, he’ll be remembered as the Cy Young winner the Indians stupidly dealt in his prime.

Nevermind, of course, that the Indians were forced to deal Sabathia because he was going to walk away three months later and because he and his teammates crumbled upon the weight of expectations in 2008. Nevermind that the primary reason that ’07 team — a “good team” in its own right, having won 96 games in the regular season — didn’t ascend to the World Series like it should have was because Sabathia was outpitched in Games 1 and 5.

If Sabathia were being honest with himself and honest with the fans, he would have said, “This is a business, and it’s difficult for a team in a smaller market like Cleveland to afford to keep its core intact. That’s why it’s a shame we weren’t able to take advantage of the special opportunity we had in ’07. And as the ace of that pitching staff, I take the brunt of the blame.”

Fat chance of the big man uttering those words.

Sabathia was treated very well here. The Indians drafted him, gave him a Major League opportunity on a playoff team when he was just 20 years old, helped mold him into a man off the field, taught him to control his emotions on it and groomed him into a Cy Young winner. Lord knows they fed him well.

That’s what makes CC’s comments above so disappointing. They reek of him being another pampered athlete with no grasp of reality or understanding of accountability.

In my view, the player-fan relationship is pretty simple. You earn our appreciation by giving your best effort on the field. Off the field, by all means, seek out your worth, find a place that you find rewarding on a personal, professional and competitive level. Chase every last dollar for you and your kids and your kids’ kids and your kids’ kids’ kids. It’s your right as a talented athlete in a lucrative game.

But please, whatever you do and wherever you go, don’t insult our intelligence along the way.

~AC

49 Comments

The point stands that CC was traded, a decision of Cleve’s FO. You bring up the fact that he was “going to walk away three months later” – Wouldn’t you take more money in the “prime” of your career?

You’re being naive if you think Sabathia is going to accept blame for breaking up a team when it was the team’s ownership which would not pay him a fair market salary.

I always wonder why reporters are quick to point fingers at players who do what anyone would do in any career (seek the best combination of working enviroment and compensation available for thier family), and at the NY Yankees who take the money they earn and invest it in the product on the field. Yes, they have an extreme advantage to other teams, but at least they put money earned into the product and play by the rules. Teams like Cleveland, pocket millions and millions of dollars of revenue sharing, television money, etc. and say screw the fans and the product! Cleveland sold out all of its games when they were competitive. Now they pocket the cash, don’t invest in thr product, and cry when they can’t sell tickets or sign key Free Agents. They traded Lee well before they needed to, and he had an extremely managebal salary for a tru ace of a staff!

Little intelligence has been shown by the “general public” in these comments to have been insulted. Anthony is 100 percent correct. Obviously, in the same situation, 99 of 100 of us would do the same thing as CC. But to turn around and blame it on the Indians’ management? There was no choice but to trade Sabathia at that point. If they’d kept you together for 2 more years? You mean if you’d wanted to stay? That’s a big foot you’ve got there. Hey AC, it would appear someone lit a fire under your butt recently.

If another company like SI.com or ESPN.com offered Anthony Castrovince guaranteed more money double the years he would tell MLB.com Bye Bye in a heart beat and he knows it. Players get ridiculed when they leave a city for more money or a better chance to win. Any other person in any other profession would do the same thing Athletes do. Doctors do it all the time they want to work at a hospital with a good reputation they don’t want to work at Dumpsville medical they move all over multiple times in there career until they get to a respectable place. Writers, TV anchors, sports announcers, radio hosts it happens everywhere.
If I was an Athlete I’m choosing the most money and the best place to live and unfortunately for Cleveland they offered less money and it’s a dump of a town. Get over and grow up Cleveland and anyone else who fells they have been burned by an athlete. Sometimes even “objective” SPORTS WRITERS need to grow up.

No – he’s absolutely correct. His point is that YES, they did trade him, but only after he made it abundantly clear that he wasn’t going to resign with the Indians. For a small market team like the Indians, an 18M/yr contract represents a sizable chunk of their budget. That was a significant offer. Was it the most he could get, no. And he chose to chase the $$, which is his prerogative. There are other athletes that don’t, like Joe Mauer and are committed to their team.

So just say, I wanted to maximize my earnings and the Yankees allowed me to do that. Don’t point fingers at Cleveland management for trying to recoup some value before you flew the coop in search of greener pastures.

Step up and be a man…

They offered him $18M per year. So he had the opportunity to take the money that was offered by the Tribe, and he chose not to. So it’s his fault that he didn’t stay here in Cleveland, Ohio. He also failed to perform in the playoffs (ALCS) in 2007. Ask C.C. if he remembers the ALCS and ask how his performance was. Ask him about his performance when he was in Milwaukee.

Yes, C.C.’s comments perhaps overly simplified a complex situation. But the insinuation here is that CC’s willingness to make the most money possible always disqualified Cleveland from contention. And that is not necessarily true, or at least, it didn’t have to be. Yes, the Yankees and Red Sox have the most money because they play in big sports markets, but their financial success really feeds upon itself- it is primarily the winning product that makes the Yankees so wealthy, and their willingness to continually pour revenue back into all aspects of the team and organization. There should be little doubt that if Cleveland had found a way to put more money into the team and offer CC a contract that was at or much closer to market value, he would have taken it to stay with a team that he by all accounts loved. You can say that Cleveland could never invest that much money in one player, but if you look at their situation now, it appears that they invested money in NONE of their major players-Martinez, Lee, and Sabathia, not to mention several other less major players. So what was their strategy all along? Certain small market teams-even those with smaller fanbases than the Indians, like the Rays, Twins, and Marlins- have shown an ability to put high-level teams on the field and maximize the talent of their stars while they still had access to them, while planning ahead for the future. Cleveland’s front office has failed singularly at that, and that is the fault of neither the fans nor the players.

Beautifully said, AC. Your assessment is spot on, and it ought to be, considering nobody following this blog has been half as close to the action as you have been on a daily basis for the past several years.

It’s disgusting to see just how selfish and ungrateful star athletes like CC & LBJ are behaving these days. Fine, take every dime you can get, even if it’s outside of Cleveland, but at least have a shred of class and gratitude on your way out.

I’m gonna go throw up now…

“to divorce himself from all blame or finger-pointing and to feed off the raw emotions of those who have done little to nothing to understand the Indians’ economic position in an unbalanced marketplace.”

Ahhh yes! The “unbalanced marketplace. Poor Indians, there owner is a man a humble means. Where would he ever get the money to extend C.C. and Cliff Lee? It’s impossible. Larry Dolan is only worth $3.3 billion. Apparently being a billionaire isn’t what it used to be.

I can’t hear the Indians fans whining because CC’s World Series Ring is talking too loud LOL. How did he do in last years playoffs and World Series?? Oh yeah, he was awesome

How Sabathia performed in the ’09 playoffs could not be more irrelevant. There is no such thing as an Indians fan who believes the Dolans are doing an adequate job operating this franchise. However, it takes both the management AND the players to create a winning team and atmosphere. In reality, it would have taken a significant investment on the part of the Dolans to make this happen and they wouldn’t be getting a return for their money in the near future – if at all. If you have read this blog consistently for the past couple years, you would know all about the vicious cycle. To blame Sabathia for all of Cleveland’s struggles would be unfair, but he’s pointing a finger at the Indians front office that was powerless to the situation they were in. The idea had always been to keep the cheap talent and trade it away before pay day.

ejceasar- his WS ring is talking too loud? terrific analogy, because rings…talk?

In my opinion AC is a solid journalist, but this may seem like sour grapes to some, especially in light of the whats his name fiasco.

The CC situation was, as tribe1045 said, “The idea had always been to keep the cheap talent and trade it away before pay day”. The fact remains that CC was technically traded, so he DOES get to use that excuse. Was it ill-concieved that he threw ownership under the bus in these recent comments? Absolutely. But should we really expect him to take some blame for being outplayed? Ehhh…probably not, because thats just the way most athletes are today.

Insightful post, AC. What I want to know is how Hoynes let him off the hook so easily. He’s so content to run endless stories on the cheap ownership and the consistent defeat – see Paul Cousineau’s excellent recent blog post on this. Thank goodness for your perspective.

What owner spends out of his own pocket? None. So being a billionaire is irrelevant. Most owners are billionaires (or close to it) and most cant spend $90M+. The Indians spent $80M+ just a few years ago, but everything fell apart and some of the main guys got hurt who were getting paid the most. They were handcuffed. Plus attendance has been poor.

Before last season I thought it meant Choke Choke. Had it not been for Paul Byrd, we wouldn’t have shown up at all in the ’07 ALCS! I just read your other piece on LeBandon. I’ve seen some of the other MLB beat writers and I fear the “competitive balance” in Celveland’s ink slinger talent is tilted too closely in our favor. You’re a fine writer AC, I hope we don’t lose you too!

You trolls (and you know who you are) are missing the point. Take the money off the table. Do you really think the Indians would have dealt Sabathia if they’d actually been in contention in the middle of ’08? Of course not. But they dug themselves into a rather large whole — for a lot of reasons, not the least of which was C.C.’s awful pitching. Sure, he managed to lower his ERA to just under 4 by the end of June, but he started the first month of the season with an ERA of nearly 8!
And this was coming off a post-season where he CHOKED.
So, yes, C.C.s’ performance directly attributed to the fact that he was traded, money or no money.

@fusion27 – Ugh, can you imagine? AC signs for big bucks and takes his insight to another market, and we’re left with the Andy Marte of beat writers, who posts about Asia and Kansas instead of Dylan and Springsteen, and Two and a Half Men instead of Seinfeld.

I only read a few paragraphs of this.
But I need to read nor more to remind you of one thing:
The SOLE reason the Tribe lost that game in 2007 was because the 3rd base coach didn’t send Kenny Lofton home. that’s it. Plain and simple. Guys (C.C.) getting out-pitched doesn’t matter when it’s the last inning and you have your fastest guy 90 feet from home and you fail. FAIL.
GO TRIBE

shyshy – The Red Sox went on to score 8 more runs before that game ended. Even if Lofton had scored (which was not a guarantee) there was a lot more that happened.

This was an awesome commentary. I am glad you had the guts to speak the truth. The players have really screwed up views about the game and they seem clueless about the economic realities and the impact it has on fans. It’s sad that they continue to blame others and say stupid things rather than accept responsibility for their selfish and greedy decisions.

Not to mention, shyshy, that had C.C. not blown both of his starts in that series, there never would have BEEN a game 7. Yes, he had nothing to do with that loss…because he didn’t play in that game.
Lofton going or not made no difference — there was still only 1 out with runners on the corners and Casey Blake hit into a double play almost immediately.

And lets be honest here. Switch out the name Cliff Lee, and you can recycle the same article.

The Indians can only sustain a certain payroll.

If Dan Gilbert owned the team we’d be in the same situation because Gilbert is a smart business man, he spends money because he MAKES money.

You can’t run a sports team like a drunk frat boy who just got his first credit card, it’s a business. You spend the money you make.

I can’t believe I’m reading thee posts and people are still blaming the Indians for the financical structure of MLB. Here’s a fact that was discussed on ESPN radio yeaterday, while discussing the career of George Steinbrenner; The Yankees annual revenue is over $600M! Yes fans, the Yankees bring in from tickets sales and especially from their YES TV network, and other sources, OVER $600M, more than the market value of the Cleveland Indians and most MLB teams for that matter. Now please tell me how even selling out every game is going to able the Tribe to compete with the Yankees and a few other teams for talent? They CANNOT! You fans blaming the Dolans are like the stock holders of a small, local software company, screaming because the board of directors aren’t spending the same amount on advertising as Microsoft. The point of the article was that C.C. had every right to go where he wanted, but acting like he was going to stay if they hadn’t traded him is a giant cop out besides being a big fat lie. C.C. leaving, like all the others who have left hurts me as a fan as much as anyone but at least I know who to blame. Write Bud Selig not the Dolans.

Just to clarify, I never “blamed” the Dolans for anything. As a matter of fact, I expressly stated that financial commitment on their part would not be warranted, because there was no guarantee of a return on their investments.

In my conversations/debate with people on various topics, be it sports, economics, or any variety, there will be sticking points to which I can no longer rationally talk to the other person unless they understand said sticking point.

The next time I’m having another debate with a woe-is-me, “DOLAN IS CHEAP!” Cleveland sports fan, I’ll just direct them to this brilliant commentary and if they don’t get it then, I’ll be on my way.

Great work, AC.

Lol, why is this C.C.’s fault again? The notion that he should have stayed for less money when speculation (correctly so) was rampant that the guy was going to end up the highest paid pitcher in the game a couple months down the road.

If anything, blame Shapiro and the Dolans for standing pat after 2007 and then impatiently blowing up the team halfway through the 2008 season by trading Sabathia, who was the team leader.

As if people wonder how this franchise lost a strong fanbase in just a few short years time already…

You “Dolan is cheap” sheep are morons. The Yankees wanted Sabathia. They make more in a season than the entire Indians franchise is worth. If the Indians had offered $25 million per season, the Yankees would have offered $30 million. If the Indians had offered $30 million, the Yankees would have offered $35.

The Dolans and the Steinbrenners spend equal portions of their revenue on the team. Maybe the Dolans could have spent a little more if some fans had actually shown up to the ballpark in 2007 when we had the best record in the the majors, but unfortunately that wasn’t the case. In any event, Sabathia was leaving no matter what, and that’s his prerogative — I just wish he wouldn’t act like the Indians somehow betrayed him by getting something in return.

Manny Ramirez, Jim Thome, Cliff Lee, CC Sabathia, Victor Martinez. All ran out of town in Cleveland, and now we have writers who want to have fans feel sorry for the Indians for being a small market team. How about a crash course in Marketing 101…….put a good product out there, and the people will buy it. Don’t expect the people to buy into it if you continue to put a mediocre team on the field. It simply doesn’t work that way.

Cleveland’s history tells us you can probably add Jake Westbrook to that list by July 31st. If you are going to cry about being a small-market team, pack it up and move to Las Vegas – but quit whining.

There is a small subset of lifelong Cleveland homer fans that play the “woe is me, I’m in a small market” card to the extreme when it comes to sports economics. Unfortunately, those people usually scream louder than the rational, intelligent Cleveland fans. They’re like the annoyingly rampant Ohio State fan: not everyone is that irrational and blind.

However, it seems that for every 1 Cleveland homer fan there are 3 irrational Cleveland bashers. These bashers are incapable of staying on topic and turn their efforts into a personal attack on Cleveland without addressing the issue at hand. The Cleveland homer behaves in an eerily similar fashion but 180 degrees in direction. Go back and read the previous 29 comments. You will notice a trend. If you don’t, then it’s because you’re either a basher or a homer.

Not resigning with Cleveland was Sabathia’s prerogative. No one can deny that but something that no one has mentioned is the pull that the player’s union has on these types of decisions. High value guys are told flat out to take the most money so they can set the market value for the next wave of free agents. Players have admitted this. At the time of Cleveland’s $18M/yr extension offer NO ONE was getting upset that Jake Peavy and Carlos Zambrano chose to stay in their respective cities for a “hometown” discount. I believe Peavy signed his extension for $18.6M/yr and Zambrano for $19M/yr. Ultimately players make their own decisions based on their preferences as EVERY person would do. Choosing to leave your original team is not a sin, but neither is being passionate about your team. Do not make assumptions nor be blind to the realities that exist in sports.

“But please, whatever you do and wherever you go, don’t insult our intelligence along the way.”

Excellent article AC you really have it right on the money as far as I am concerned . He was the goat… just as Mesa was in the series and we could list a number of big letdowns …Carter going to Toronto to win a WS….. etc etc etc The fact is, as you said He knew he was leaving. He never had any class in my book and I am glad he is gone Now Cliff Lee? Can we get him back?

It seems several of you of completely ignorant of what the article is about. It’s not about C.C. taking the most money, it’s about the fact that he is re-writing history by stating that Cleveland let that team fall apart. C.C. had no interest in re-signing with Cleveland. He knew no one could match the Yankees offer. C.C. went to the Yankees which is his right, but he needs to quit blaming Cleveland for that.
And for you Yankee fans, well, thanks for the money, it’s the least you can do since you stack the deck every year.

Craig – Your right and he didn’t help with his performance. He’s part of the reason why he was traded in 2008. It’s his right to go elsewhere, but he doesn’t want to be accountable for his poor performance and wants to blame the FO for not keeping the team together. It’s really an unbalanced playing field when it comes to getting the best players via free agency. Small Market teams like ours have to do it through Drafting, international scouting and trading.

I’d say this post was spot on. Yes, the Indians traded/didn’t re-sign Sabathia, and ultimately that’s the fault of ownership. If ownership felt he was worth the investment, they could have matched the offer. Honestly, he wasn’t worth that investment though, at least to Cleveland, and Sabathia knew that then and knows that now. I’ll be completely shocked if the Yankees get through that contract without paying $23 million/year for nothing over multiple years. For New York, that might be worth it, because Sabathia already led them to 1 World Series win and increased revenue. For the Indians, if they still retained the services of Sabathia, Lee and Martinez, they would still not be a good team, and it wouldn’t have led to any substantial increase in revenue. They had all 3 of those guys in 2008, and they were still a bad team with poor attendance. The Indians might be .500 this year if they had those guys, though I doubt it (Santana looks like a significant UPGRADE to the injured Martinez, for one thing. They have an identical WAR right now, despite Santana playing 37 fewer games than Martinez so far) Paying Sabathia $23 million to NOT win would be crazy. They could have won in 2007, back when they still had healthy Grady, Victor was still young enough to catch without ending up on the DL, and Hafner wasn’t yet a complete waste, and they didn’t win, and that IS on Sabathia, who choked badly in the playoffs, and also struggled badly to start ’08. It’s also on Lee, who chose ’07 as the year he’d totally suck.

Not only did CC have a 6.00 ERA against Boston in 2007, people seem to forget that he spurned contract offers AFTER going to New York to pick up his Cy Young award, and then started the 2008 season 0-6!

If CC had at least started well in 2008, the Indians maybe hang on early on when the team was struggling and then ride CC and Lee and his Cy young award season back to the playoffs.

The other thing not mentioned is that the ENTIRE CORE was signed through 2010 with the exception of CC. I believe Shapiro was hoping for a reasonable contract of between 18-20 million a year in exchange for keeping the entire core of the 2007 team intact through 2010.

CC’s revisionist history is outrageous and wrong on all fronts.

He claimed to have been told that the person responsible for the leaks had been arrested.
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It seems several of you of completely ignorant of what the article is about. It’s not about C.C. taking the most money, it’s about the fact that he is re-writing history by stating that Cleveland let that team fall apart. C.C. had no interest in re-signing with Cleveland. He knew no one could match the Yankees offer. C.C. went to the Yankees which is his right, but he needs to quit blaming Cleveland for that 646-578646-671

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Just an absolutely brilliant column, AC. One of the best I’ve ever seen, and I’m incredibly proud of you for writing it. Unfortunately, if C.C. were to read this, his egomaniacal brain would be unable to process it.

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